Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category



Oil: Why the Rally

My view on crude is that the move is a result of increasing tensions in the Middle East. Iran produces 4.3 mm bbl/day, almost 50% of Saudi Arabian capacity and has 13% of global reserves. Good opinion piece in WSJ today lays out why we should all fear the radical Iranian regime and be supportive of a pre-emptive strike even though this will spike crude prices further. Pay now or really pay later. Fear over war breaking out in Middle East over this issue driving fear factor in crude. From a demand standpoint, the slowing European economy will eventually pressure oil prices.

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Short the Rumor; Buy the Disaster

One of the best performing funds this year – actually any year – would be one that shorts the pop on every rumored takeover target. Here is what a partial holdings list would have looked like – all at much higher prices: HPQ (pure lunacy that ORCL would buy them); GM; X: AKS; NFLX (still a short); WLT; RIMM; POT; MU; FCX, CREE; AKAM; SHAW. Of course some of these turn out to be good longs at some point and I own HPQ, RIMM and WLT but bought after rumors didn’t pan out. Ironically some become more attractive after large declines such as WLT and RIMM. Rumors are usually code for someone saying “How the heck do I get out of this bad position!”

Natural Gas, Crude

California fired the regulators most responsible for limiting number of drilling permits – only 10% OK’d YTD.. KEG has 15% of fleet in CA and their business has been slow there. This should provide lift. Monterrey Shale estimated to have 15 billion barrels of oil. I added to KEG. Positive for OXY and PXP also.

Am I Still Bearish? Sort of Not

I have had very light equity exposure for an extended period of time with periods of being net short to being fairly long. Fortunately, with the indices having been range bound, the opportunity cost has been insignificant. As I mentioned in a prior note being bearish is exhausting, lonely and counter to my natural optimism (although I do admit to always maintaining a healthy dose of cynicism). Imagine taking your child to see 101 Dalmatians and loudly rooting for Cruella deVille to come out on top. Your kid shrinks away to another seat on the other side of the theater while others shun you. That’s how bears are treated.

I continually second guess my investment thesis, trying to see what the other side sees. I weigh the inputs underlying my stance, marking them to market. I try to remove the bias of my position as I seek additional data that is either supportive or unsupportive of my position. And of course, there is always the fear of acting from emotion that prompts a change in thinking, a feeling that you weren’t invited to the party, of being left out. And most of all, there is that greatest fear of all, of having reversed course at absolutely the wrong time. And in full disclosure, I have not always made the turn in a very timely fashion. I did well in 2008 but hardly made any money in 2009. Although I was still ahead of the game, it still didn’t feel good missing out on a ripping bull market move.

So where am I now? I am warming up to the market. Why? Well, I have often said I have seen this movie before and it ended badly but maybe there will be a different ending to this installment because everyone else had also seen the prequel to the 2011 financial crisis. My ending has banks struggling to raise capital, some, like Dexia or perhaps Greece, going belly up, credit continuing to tighten, economies contracting – the culmination of all these fears and others I haven’t listed causing a massive wave of selling. But guess what? Merkel and Sarkozy and the more responsible members of the G-20 and EU were also around in 2008 and they have no interest in revisiting that scenario. Granted they have waited too long and the cost of delay has ratcheted up the price of a cure. Germany and France have the most to lose by not putting forth a viable solution. While expectations for a total and complete solution are still high, they have been ratcheted down enough to be attainable, or near attainable with the promise to be completely resolved in the next 3 to 6 months. Shock and awe is not in the cards and everyone knows it. But will they give us enough to put a floor under the market and cause under invested funds to chase performance? I think so.

Swimming upstream, against the tide of bullishness that is the unwavering stance by the vast majority of pundits and market participants is difficult enough but imagine the flood gates being opened and the water gushing at you as you flutter kick your portfolio like a foam kickboard. The world is awash in liquidity. It all comes down to not fighting the Fed. But the much maligned U.S. Fed has recruited a legion of Central Bankers to fight the battle: the EU, IMF and China. This is a massive liquidity push by every printing press on the planet. So for now, I am entering into surrender negotiations and further increasing my exposure further.

I am by no means becoming fully invested for I still have that evil twin whispering in my ear. The global economy is in terrible shape but what do I know that others don’t? I don’t have an edge on China – it’s a property bubble that has already begun to leak – but the Chief Communist (as opposed to Chief Economist) knows that. I think that will end ugly but they can throw enough money at it in the interim to allow the S&P to rise to 1250, a random number, while their market declines. Europe is in recession but that thinking is convention and is nothing that $1.3 trillion can’t cure.

The most alpha will likely be generated through commodities and materials – the most economically sensitive investments – but I can’t go all that way in. There is too much risk in case I am wrong. I do like the fertilizer companies for the long term and although recovering, they have been beaten worse than a Middle Eastern dictator. I still prefer the more boring fundamentally, bottoms up investments epitomized by MDRX, KO, QCOM, WLP, NIHD. My risk is in bottom fishing on HPQ and, dare I admit it, RIMM. I cut back my Euro short against the dollar but will rebuild that position again at some point.

How long the cure lasts is what keeps a lid on my exposure. At some point austerity leads to slower growth and U.S. economic policy is non-existent as Washington remains rudderless. Everyone believes China will bail out every local government, corporate and individual spectators but I don’t. After all, they are communists and not prone to providing handouts to failing billionaires or local governments who have repeatedly disobeyed central government directives. There will be some pain to teach them a lesson.

I won’t be discouraged if there is a sell on the news mentality once the EU deal is announced. And I am rooting for another delay in the announcement because that means they are still arguing – eh, negotiating. And I expect leaks from the negotiations to cause some volatility. We should continue to move higher, perhaps rally 20% before going lower, likely hitting prior lows.

Whoops, there I go again.

European Sovereign Debt Crisis Survey – What Is/Was Discounted In The Markets

In my view, the most important issue facing the markets is the European sovereign debt crisis. This issue is the breeding ground for so many other factors facing the global economy being that the EU collectively represents perhaps the most significant trading partner for China and the U.S. With this in mind, last Friday, I sent out a survey containing 5 simple questions to a small portion of my contact list with the intent of gauging what sophisticated, institutional investors believe the market is telling us about resolution of the crisis. Admittedly, the sampling was small in terms of respondents but the dollars under management significant. I supplemented the written survey with  conversations soliciting responses to the same questions. Fortunately, not one of my friends added me to their Do Not Call List. Now, in full disclosure, I am not a graduate of Quinnipiac University nor a former employee of Harris Polling, but this did not stop me from understanding the clear message of the data. The overwhelming majority of the respondents believe that the market is discounting the most positive scenario and that if this were not delivered, albeit with a time frame for compliance of 3 to 6 months, that the indices would hit new lows. Giving credence to this view is the fact that the recent rally in the S&P began contemporaneously with the Sarkozy and Merkel speech wherein they stated that they have a meeting of the minds regarding what needs to be done to stem the crisis. November 3rd was the drop dead date they offered for presenting a unified plan although recent chatter and an increased sense of urgency has served to have brought the date for resolution closer by a week.

Today, this changed, as Germany threw cold water on a shock and awe solution resulting in a 2% decline in the S&P. It would not be inappropriate to argue that the market went from an oversold to overbought and today’s action was normal consolidation but I disagree. Now, in fairness, I applaud the Germans for reining in expectations that became much too optimistic. I had, in fact, pointed out in prior notes that the news flow would create peaks and valleys in the averages along the road to November 3rd. Today was the first valley but I feel there will be more to come. I also mentioned late last week (Have We Seen The Future: The European Solution…  October 13th) that I had taken off some long exposure and right now I have no interest in revisiting my strategy. That was the right move and I further reduced my net long exposure early in today’s trading session.

I hope the Europeans continue to reset expectations but even if they do, it will only forestall the inevitable because I do not see shock and awe coming anytime soon. I remain cautious on the market overall and continue to see the Euro short as a compelling investment.

The European Sucker Play; US Stock Bargains; Apple

The most important real near term news coming out of Europe will be the ECB rate decision tomorrow. Trichet is bidding adieu at the end of October and this is his last opportunity to reverse the prior rate hike. Does he head to Hotel du Cap admitting a mistake or stick to his guns and allow Mario Draghi to cut, although he has previously said it isn’t necessary. Perhaps the economic releases this morning may spur the correct decision, in conjunction with recent declines in commodity prices. Eurozone services PMI fell to 48.8 from 51.5 according to Markit survey, first month since August 2009 below 50. In other releases, Germany was sub 50 as well, France barely above 50, Italy and Spain continue below 50 at very low levels of 45 but they are already in recession. My guess is that France and Germany experience contractions in economic growth as well.

More importantly, does the troika come up with a major bail out prior to Trichet leaving and before Draghi takes over. Not sure how many EU members want an Italian telling them they have to pony up vast sums to save Italy. Fox guarding the chicken coop? Not quite but this will ratchet up the opposition or lengthen the time to cure if Trichet doesn’t act first.

The Financial Times had the story that wasn’t a story. The following 2 lines squeezed the shorts, lit a fire under those with light exposure and gave us all something to talk about.

“There is an increasingly shared view that we need a concerted, co-ordinated approach in Europe while many of the elements are done in the member states,” Olli Rehn, European commissioner for economic affairs, told the Financial Times. “There is a sense of urgency among ministers and we need to move on.”

“Capital positions of European banks must be reinforced to provide additional safety margins and thus reduce uncertainty,” Mr Rehn said. “This should be regarded as an integral part of the EU’s comprehensive strategy to restore confidence and overcome the crisis.…”

Rehn’s statement was nothing more than an attempt to put a temporary halt to the market crisis, an admirable goal, but hopefully there is ultimately more substance behind it. With the public division in the EU about solutions, I fear any resolution will be a long time in coming. Even the ESFS is flawed with Italy and Spain committing to guarantees of 79 billion Euros and 52 billion Euros, respectively. And, of course, Greece has agreed to be on the hook for 12 billion. I feel better now.

So the market basically did a hosanna that it has dawned on the EU finance ministers that they have developed a sense of urgency and will act together. Truth is we don’t know that they will act together but ultimately there has to be a plan. Unfortunately, from where I sit, the plan won’t be good for anyone, particularly the banks. We need a flush of the credit markets with tremendous pain being visited on the private sector because the political will for government to bail out all troubled banks and PIIGS does not exist. The result would be to wipe out the equity of a number of French banks as we are seeing with Dexia, which was originally bailed out in 2008 by France and Belgium. Now here they go again. Public shareholders have twice suffered significant losses. Dexia is also a good example of contagion as the municipalities in the US that do business with Dexia will likely see their borrowing costs increase as a result. And this is a minor case of contagion; it will get worse (Plus the 2008 similarities continue with good bank/bad bank solutions that don’t work.)

My bet is that Greece defaults in a “controlled” manner (not sure that exists) with limited alimony payments from the EU as a going away gift. At the same time, Italian and Spanish debt issues are ring fenced, the French banks recapitalized after taking significant write downs which almost wipes out equity holders with new shares or debt being backstopped by Germany and France as the main players. France loses their AAA, which is past its sell-by date anyway. We will also see massive liquidity injected into the European financial system causing a further decline in the Euro.

I’m waiting for this event to increase my exposure. With the slowing in China, Europe and the U.S., I’m highly confident that I can get a better entry point and keep more hair from falling out.

AAPL – still a cheap stock and the issues are well discounted in the stock price. I’m not going to beat up on Street research – well yes I am. The Street clearly has no idea what is going on with the company. If they can’t get major product launches correct, how are they doing the more difficult task of forecasting. It took me a few days to get a number I was looking for which is what percentage of ipads sold are wifi only. I’m going with the only answer that I got which is 65 – 70%. This is interesting because much was made of the fact that the new Amazon product is only wifi. Well, at a $300 difference for a product with a great brand name and very good functionality, if I didn’t own an ipad, I would seriously consider the Kindle Fire. I know that the ipad has 425,000 apps and the Fire doesn’t, but frankly, I ran out of patience after putting the first 150,000 apps on my screen. My issue with AAPL is margins. With strong competitors like Amazon and Google (android) at lower price points, is yesterday’s pricing of the iphone 4 and 4S a harbinger of lower margins and more competition? Apple has never been one to price to competitors’ levels but shouldn’t hat have to change? Tim Cook noted that 92% of the Fortune 500 are testing ipads. The opportunities in the enterprise space are interesting but keep in mind that most likely this is demand push by Apple, a common sales technique which I am glad to see them employ. I’m sure there is reverse inquiry as well. I would also guess that corporate procurement execs are more concerned with costs in a challenging economic environment and agnostic as to which quality brand they purchase. The dominant corporate usage is also likely wifi since it will be on premises as ipads are not a good substitute for laptops. Nonetheless this is a great revenue opportunity particularly if it scales into other Apple products.

Finally, on the US. We’re still without a plan and the economic numbers continue to look punk, today’s non-mfg ISM the latest example. Freight stocks are moving higher despite yesterday’s IATA airfreight numbers remaining below seasonal trends indicating a slow economy. Asia and the US showed particularly poor.

Even though the market is oversold and will have bear market rallies, I remain on the sidelines for the most part but do like a few stocks.

Wellpoint’s valuation seems compelling at less than 9X 2011 EPS. Company guidance is in a tight range either side of $7.00. They just added $5 billion to their buyback, an astonishing 21% of the company. Management said it will be completed over several years but they just bought back $1.5 billion since announcing a $1.6 billion program in February. That was about 5%. Plus I’m getting an okay yield of 1.6%.

I also like KO. Not huge growth but very dependable, the risk to earnings from currency being discounted by recent downgrades from the Street. At a 12 P/E and 3% yield it provides good, lower beta market exposure. If market explodes higher, neither WLP or KO will lead the pack but I will participate in the upside with limited downside.

QCOM remains a core holding. Tim Cook is an engineer and over saw procurement so he’s definitely on board with QCOM as the relationship, started in earnest this year, has taken root on his watch. They own CDMA and are embedded in android as well as ipad and iphone. QCOM ahs also been very friendly to shareholders, often returning capital.

HPQ is also inexpensive, even with a haircut (all the rage in financial circles these days) to earnings. My primary concern management, including the BOD. Still wish Meg didn’t speak about making the quarter. Would rather have had her reset bar lower.

China: Not on Goldilocks World Tour; The Global Economy; Copper, Commodities Lower.

The best thing that can be said for China is Europe.  But the worst thing that can be said for copper is China.

Europe continues to dominate the headlines, the immediacy of their issues relegating China to the back pages of the business press and investors’ minds.  This puts China in a very tough position between rooting for the EU, their top trading partner, to quickly put their sovereign debt issues behind them, and hoping they stay front and center, keeping China’s significant woes off the front page.  I know what Confucius would advise but his teachings have gone by the wayside quicker than a Ferrari barreling down Nanjing Road in Shanghai.

The biggest issue with China of course is the property bubble.  This exists not just for housing but also for commercial construction.  Given restrictions on lending at the local government level and tightening measures imposed by the central government, property developers have had to engage in creative financing techniques to continue building buildings that reportedly have very high vacancy rates. The credit agencies have taken aim at the banks, who own the local government debt, believing that the liabilities are understated, $540 billion being the amount recently mentioned by Moody’s.  I’m going to wager that Moody’s stays true to its reputation for accuracy and has vastly understated the issue, which, given the lack of transparency and controls in China, is a safe bet.  But using this figure and putting it in perspective, it is almost equivalent to the size of China’s stimulus package post 2008 crisis.  Let’s see what happens when that large sum of money works in reverse, choking off the economy and triggering defaults. What is most troubling is how much of the Chinese economy is dependent on this bubble.  This quote from Bloomberg is alarming (http://www.businessweek.com/news/2011-09-23/china-s-squeeze-on-property-market-nearing-tipping-point-.html).  “China Real Estate Information Corp., a Shanghai-based property information and consulting firm, estimates 40 percent of overall local government revenue came from land sales last year.”  And, the local government involvement doesn’t stop there as they set up Trust companies, often in partnership with developers, to fund development.

Of course, there are those that hang onto the vision of the central government acting like the mother of a rambunctious 4 year old who scraps his knee but mommy won’t kiss this boo-boo and make it all better.  Sure, some of the developers who are closest to the ministers remaining open to receiving another Rolex Daytona in exchange for favorable treatment will not suffer as much but I doubt the government will bail out all the banks and developers.  The WSJ had 3 articles, all appropriately yellow flags.  Interestingly, and to this point, one of the world’s and China’s largest banks may seek to raise another $11 billion from the capital markets to protect the balance sheet against increasing bad debts.  When have you ever seen one capital raise be enough?  Exactly, and not here either since this bank has already raised $20 billion over the past two years.

In the most recent survey of home property prices recorded by the statistics bureau, for the first time less than half of the 70 cities posted month on month gains although all cities showed an increase, also for the first time this year.  This is troubling since it indicates that despite Premier Wen’s desire to cool off the overheated market, local governments refuse to participate relying heavily on higher prices on land sales.

Suppose I’m wrong and the government is more magnanimous than I estimate, writing checks to everyone who has wagered on prices forever climbing?  The conclusion for copper won’t change since it will still take a long time to absorb the current building inventory.  Construction is estimated to be between 50-70% of China’s GDP.  That soaks up a lot of energy, copper, steel and construction equipment which all feed into the global economy.

Soft landing for China?  That’s not what the direction of their bank stocks and property development companies will tell you.  I doubt that Goldilocks, she of the “not too cold, not too hot, just right” school of optimism, will be including China on her world tour.  Besides, she has signed on for additional dates in Europe and theU.S.

As to the U.S. indices, China surprisingly doesn’t mean much for now until the tipping point becomes apparent to all and the fog from Europe burns off.  All that matters for now is the impendingU.S.earnings season and Europe.  While I expect the ESFS to be approved, I’m not so sure the political appetite exists for the shock and awe leveraged fund that is needed to put a floor on the market.  But opinions on the outcome are like ipads, everyone has one.


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