Posts Tagged 'CHK'

Paris Hilton, Europe and China, Energy – Natural Gas: the new HK and CHK, AAPL

The ratings agencies continue to be as effective as Paris Hilton at a spelling bee as seen by Moody’s latest action of putting some banks under review.   The real troubled period for the U.S. banks has, for the most part passed, so near as I can tell the ratings agencies are pressing their shorts.  To paraphrase the anti-motto of the UFT: “Those that analyze, analyze and those that can’t, work for the ratings agencies.”  Throughout my career, I never recall anyone resigning from a fund or investment bank to go on to the greener passages of the ratings agencies.  “I’ve finally made it; my dreams have come true.  I’ve landed this incredible position at S&P.  Sure I will have to get a night job to make up for the lower pay and have to adjust to working in a cubicle the size of a bathroom stall – it’s not easy balancing my family pictures on a roll of toilet paper – but I have my nights free and significantly less pressure since there is no penalty for being late or wrong.”  As a comedian feels about a significantly overweight individual with a very bad toupee, we should all be indebted to the ratings agencies for providing us with such easy fodder.

 

China continues to be a primary concern for me. I noted yesterday the downside of China’s check in the mail commitment to assist in the European bailout as a sign that things are worse for China’s economy than the market has believed.  I postulated the Chinese are seeing more than passing weakness in their economy as a derivative of the weakness in Europe, their largest trading partner.  And today we see the rationale for China’s magnanimous and proactive statement of financial support.  Foreign investment in China is declining and is at the lowest level since 2009, the bottom of the last recession.  Earlier in the week, the city of Wuhu terminated their policy of providing subsidies to home buyers at the behest of the central government, signaling to me that they are more concerned with a property bubble and inflation than they are with a slowing economy, recognizing what Greenspan failed to see.  China bulls remain steadfast in their conviction of a soft landing, the strategy underlying this belief is that the communists will deploy their massive (but fading) foreign reserves in support of Ferrari driving real estate developers, overextended municipal governments (40% of revenues from property sales and subsequent deals to develop), shadow financiers and the occasional overextended homeowner.  Now add in profligate European sovereigns and we have the first “born again” communist country.  Somehow, I believe this will not be the case, given their very long term view; they will let these folks all suffer their sins to a large extent and not be as generous as a Greek politician who has had way too many shots of ouzo.

 

However, with Europe estimated to account for approximately 18% of their trade, look for  increasing comments professing support.  In fact, China may decide to tender for the EU rather than picking off their assets piecemeal.

 

Greece will ultimately default even though the troika may put them on an allowance rather than providing a lump sum.  The installment plan buys the troika more time to put together a plan to ring fence the other over extended sovereigns.   A Grecian default, not to be confused with allowing the gray to grow out from your scalp, would result in a knee jerk reaction lower in the markets and then a move higher as the credit markets realize that the EU is finally ready to enforce fiscal discipline.   This would actually cause a major rally in the Euro but for now I am staying short, having rebuilt the position over the last week on the belief that all the good news was out and as crowded as the short trade was, the long trade was now the more popular investment.

 

I’m still in the camp of consolidation with somewhat higher equity exposure in lower beta, value stocks and short positions in commodities such as coal, steel and copper.    Perhaps we get a reaction move lower but with the massive liquidity in global markets and more due on 2/29 from the new and kinder “ECB”, bonds are the riskier asset and stocks more attractive.

 

And  one more thing, Apple.  I get that the stock action has accounted for a large percentage of the underlying averages but two things: the story is far from over and the market can move independently from the shares of AAPL.

 

Natural gas.  Looks like the lows may have been put in.  At the end of the day, we’re capitalists and the energy industry in this country is still one of the best managed sectors we have.  While the glut is not over, and hopefully the government recognizes the wisdom of incenting greater usage of natural gas as a replacement for crude, the shut ins are encouraging.  Of course, while the warm weather has increased “inventory” levels of natural gas and coal, these will be depleted at some point and are arguably reflected in the price of the equities to a large extent.  We have two CEO’s in energy that actually do what they say they will do: Floyd Wilson and Aubrey McClendon.  Floyd has been a major creator of wealth as he built and sold, to the benefit of shareholders, 3 companies. He is now in the process of doing it again with Halcon Resources (HK, a ticker in the Hall of Fame for its association with Petrohawk, has had its jersey unretired).  He makes no bones about it: I will build it and exit.  The $550 million he brought to the party underscores his commitment.  As to CHK, admittedly the debt levels, not so onerous in a different environment, are squarely in Aubrey’s sights and he has surprised the Street yet again by targeting higher levels of asset sales and further pay down of debt.  Underlying this, and somewhat unnoticed, is the transformation of a company too dependent upon natural gas (they have also announced they will shut in some gas)  to one with a stronger focus on liquids.  This is what will also drive the new HK – a focus on liquids as opposed to Petrohawk’s dry gas model.  Top CEOs understand and respond to changing market dynamics.

 

Disclosure: I am long HK, CHK, EUO and short AAPL puts.

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The Market: New Year’s Resolutions Are Made To Be Broken; More Positive On US Equities

The Market: New Year’s Resolutions Are Made To Be Broken

 

I sat back and marveled at the action in the global markets on Tuesday, wondering if these non-human entities had all of a sudden turned human making New Year’s resolutions to ignore underlying fundamentals and rally 2% a day. But guess what, markets don’t drunkenly warble Auld Lang Syne in symbolic banishment of times gone.  There is no Lord of the Calendar presiding over the indices, ripping the pages of 2011 from the binding, erasing the memory of an ailing global economy, resetting expectations to a level of attainability where economic indicators such as Eurozone PMI indicating a contracting economy are now a positive indicator.  In fact, the only symbolic symmetry I can find is in the economic hangover rattling the brains of money managers finance ministers and newly crowned technocrats the world over.

 

So as January rolls around we are still faced with the same positives and negatives, each release of data driving the markets, each tick of the currency market correlated to the price of commodities and equities.  But here’s THE but: I am more attracted to US equities than I was in 2011.  That is my resolution for the New Year BUT unlike those who resolve to lose significant weight in 2012, my complete transformation won’t happen in one day although it should endure past the next buffet – I mean, rally.

 

Yesterday’s Unicredit rights offering was not a positive sign for the markets.  The 27 investment banks underwriting the offering reportedly accounted for three-quarters of demand for the $9.8 billion offering, a high price to pay for a call option on future fees and one which toxifies (literary alert: new word) their balance sheets in the name of fees and, no doubt, in response to arm twisting by the ECB.  Shareholders were diluted to near zero and the deal was underwater from the first tick.   Can’t imagine there is much appetite for these types of deals going forward as it will swell “bad” assets at the banks involved, somewhat ironically I might add.

 

I still believe that we will see nationalization or partial nationalization of some banks.  The reason is simple: as with Unicredit, their problem loans and refinancing needs exceed their market caps.  Additionally, compliance with Basil standards has led to these banks pulling in credit lines, the most immediate response, which has stifled credit and slowed economic growth.  This, of course, is why the ECB has initiated their lending program.  I surmise that Draghi has had conversations with the banks taking advantage of this lending facility to participate in the new issue market.

 

Next week is critical as Italy and Spain come to market seeking capital from charitable buyers.  European debt is actually not a bad play if you can hold it longer term because it is extremely unlikely that either country will default.  However, I’m not playing and believe the price they have to pay to fund themselves will be extraordinarily high and for Italy this is only the beginning of their refunding.

 

All of this comes down to the fact that there is still no plan to “cure” the credit crisis in Europe, absent austerity measures that will likely not be enforced or enacted to the necessary magnitude and will only be effective in continuing to drive the EU economy into recession.  It is a lose-lose situation.  The loan facility has removed fears of a Lehman type moment but that is not nearly enough.  We still need to see the heavy artillery from the EU in the form of stimulus.  For example, Italy has had one of the slowest growing economies over the last 20 years of all OECD nations.  They can’t cut their way to growth.  I look at the banks continuing to park funds overnight with the ECB at record levels as insider trading: they know their market better than sell-side analysts or pundits and if they are willing to take such an imbalance in rates of return in exchange for the safety of the ECB, the problems are as bad as I imagine them to be.

 

But China will save us all!  No they won’t; they will look out for themselves and prey on the markets as they always have.  They see commodity prices declining so they will not enter the markets and be the support mechanism until they are down to their last copper penny.   China is on the bad end of two phenomenon:  its property bubble bursting and its primary end market’s  – the Eurozone – declining economy. Their trade surplus declined from $180 billion in 2010 to $160 billion 2011, numbers that any other nation would be happy with but not the Chinese.  This is positive for the US but may be a short lived victory as they dropped the value of the yuan this morning, a reversal of prior policy and a move that will undoubtedly flame already tense relations with the US.  This is a strong indication that the Chinese are very, and justifiably, concerned about their economy markedly slowing despite the recent PMI release.  This slowing will, of course, hit the global economy but especially Australia which is why I am short the Aussie dollar, albeit small for now.  Additionally, the property market in Australia is in horrendous shape and significantly hurting their banks and populous.  They have to lower rates, further pressuring the currency.

 

Now here is the good news as I see it and it resides squarely with the U.S. market and as a devout patriot, I couldn’t be happier.  The US treasury and stock markets are the global default markets of choice. Despite 2011 4Q negative pre-announcements hitting a high previously seen during two prior recessions in 2001 and 2008, the economic data is getting better.   Today’s jobless claims number continues to trend downward, which I believe is a function of a smaller sampling and companies having already cut through muscle so perhaps not an indication of a vastly improving employment picture but positive nonetheless.   Corporate earnings lag the improvement in the economy as companies ultimately respond by hiring more workers.  However, I do see earnings estimates continuing to decline, particularly multinationals from the combination of weaker export markets and a stronger USD.  Analysts are too optimistic in their S&P estimates for 2012.

 

So I remain relatively lightly position in equities, short the Euro against the dollar and short the AUD.  The U.S. equity markets will continue to react to the worsening situation in the EU and have a tough time rising near term.  However, asset allocation to equities, which I expected to see last year and perhaps we did to an extent, will ultimately drive equities higher so I don’t mind increasing my exposure opportunistically.

 

My preference is in defensive, domestically focused companies including healthcare, specifically managed care, nat gas, well-positioned retail, MLPs, utilities, US telecom and strong brands such as SBUX.  Some of my specific holdings are: CHK (CEO continues to pay down debt and restructure production toward liquids from nat gas as he said he would), WLP (inexpensive, buying back significant stock, defensive), NS (7.5% yld, insider buying), QCOM (market leader), GM (cheap but not in love with name), KO (yield, defensive but currency issues), EUO, short FXA.  Would not mind being short LNKD, GRPN, NFLX and ZNGA. This earnings season will be marked by currency adjustments and caution about Europe so I will mostly stay away from those companies playing in those areas.

 

Meanwhile, with some stability returning to the political scene in the US and Romney moving to the forefront, any sense of his emerging victorious in November will finally motivate US companies to spend the massive cash hoard on their balance sheet.  This is not an immediate event, however.

 

So there you have it. Nothing much has changed, the focus required to write 20”12” instead of 2011 really the only thing new.  I get the hang of that relatively quickly, usually after writing about 5 checks and filling out a few forms.  The markets however, have not changed their ways at all, renouncing their resolutions after a mere two days.

 

In sum, I am more positively disposed to the markets and have slightly increased exposure but want to get a better glimpse of the earnings season and the critical refunding periods for European debt before getting longer.


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