Posts Tagged 'Economy'

The Perfectly Written FOMC Statement For Stock Pickers

The concerns supporting a bear view on U.S. indices issues prior to yesterday’s FOMC press release were clear:

1)      “I’m negative on the market because the economy is not recovering.”

2)      “The Fed is killing us by keeping interest rates so low.  Savings accounts are a negative carry, hurting the household.”

3)      “The QE’s were a disaster and did nothing but we’ll take another serving.”

4)      “The banks can’t make money with a flat yield curve.”

5)      “Inflation is an issue.”

6)      “Europe and China will take us down.”

In my view, the FOMC press release was perfectly turned out for everyone except for those misguided souls staying too long at the bond party.  To paraphrase the statement:  the economy is recovering but we’re going to keep rates low until the end of 2014.  Instead of driving the markets lower, investors should do a hosanna, take a breath and start picking stocks – not any stocks, but those more dependent on the U.S. economy.   The rising tide lifting all stocks is ebbing making this a great environment for stock picking.

 

By not hinting at a QE3 while paying homage to an improving economy and labor market – I trust the Fed’s mark-to-market much more so than their forecasts –  a large part of the bear case for US equities was served a debilitating blow.  After a short period of adjustment the market will continue its assent.  Yes, markets do rise as the Fed tightens as long as monetary policy remains fairly accommodative.  But all is not lost as to the Fed and monetary policy.  As with a recovering addict in rehab who has been mainlining heroin courtesy of a benevolent pusher, the Fed will not force us to go cold turkey so I look for a modest bridge to higher rates upon the expiration of Operation Twist in June.

The focus of naysayers will now increase on the purported impact a slowing global economy may have upon the U.S.  and, ultimately, our equities.  What has resonated so loudly is silence on the fact that the U.S.  still has largest economy in the world and that while not entirely self-sustainable, we can drive decent growth given that our reliance on the EU and China as markets for our goods is small relative to our internal consumption.

Banks, already on the upswing from improving credit, upward trending existing home sales, and being the beneficiaries of distressed European banks’ need to sell non-distressed assets at distressed prices, will soon be able to make money on a steepening yield curve.  This environment should be panacea for U.S. banks providing they remain disciplined in feeding out their inventory of homes to an improving market.

Inflationary pressures caused by a weaker dollar will abate, not that the Fed ever saw them as anything more than transitory, pressuring gold but helping the consumer as will higher yielding bank accounts but pity the fool who doesn’t see major principal loss in much small moves in yield.

I continue to like the market primarily because I anticipate upside in this reporting season relative to expectations, laboring under the belief that businesses and individuals are stronger.  I like the USD long versus the Euro short.  I hate the Aussie dollar and added to my short; China is a drag on their export and minerals economy and they have extremely high rates that have to come down.  I am long domestically focused equities.  Technology continues to play an important part in my portfolio, the issue with SNDK specific to their business model (I bought today).  I am opportunistically shorting steel, copper and coal on a trading basis.

Go U-S-A.  U-S-A.  U-S-A.

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The market of the last two days reminds me of my grandfather, Phil.  He was a surly guy and had his voice been disassociated from his body, one would have envisioned a much more stout individual than he actually was. Gravity had taken its toll as he advanced into his 90’s, shrinking his frame to little more than five feet two on his tallest days.  The often inverse correlation of age to patience took its toll and his gruff and demanding personality continued to overshadow a diminutive frame, expanding to a size that would better fit someone sporting the physique of Ray Lewis or Vitali Klitcshko.  Phil was never indecisive in his demands but increasingly, he never wanted what he asked for.   The following true story provides an example and a parallel to today’s market.

“I’ll take the sirloin,” he grumbled.

“Of course, sir.  How would you like it prepared?”

“Medium” he groused in response.

The kitchen turned it out perfectly medium but his rote response, his knee jerk reaction, was to send it back.

“This is raw,” he said, misconstruing pink for red.  “It needs more fire.  I don’t want to see any pink.  I want it well-done,” he barked, clearly contradicting his original order although he didn’t see it that way.

The waiter did as he was told and again delivered the steak perfectly prepared to order; well-done, not charred.  My grandfather’s rebuke was even more harsh.

“This is burnt,” he said, chastising the defenseless waiter.

And so it went.  I left significant compensatory damages behind, padding my grandfather’s meager tips, hoping to assuage my embarrassment and to maintain my good standing with the service establishment in New York City.

The moral: .   While you can hardly compare ordering a steak to positioning a portfolio but if Phil had not pre-judged the result, determined to return the slab of meat even if it came out perfectly cooked, perhaps he would have been able to profit from a good result.

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Yesterday’s Blog – Nat Gas; Netflix (NFLX) Hastings Has A Solution for Europe; President Obama, Merkel,

My sources provided unique insights into the European Finance Ministers’ Meeting in Poland this past weekend:

Germany: I would like to invite Herr Geithner to our little party.

Poland: Whatever you say, boss.

Austria: Absolutely not. He has no personality and is way too American, always telling people what to do.

France: It’s a long trip and he probably won’t even come. He’ll probably just send a really big check as a gift with his regrets.

Belgium: Rubbish. I heard he’s in debt over his head and his boss is soon to be out of a job which means he’s also on borrowed time.

Germany: Look, I am paying for the party and I want him to come. Hopefully, he says nein and sends a check. If we don’t invite him we stand no chance of getting anything from him.

Austria: Fine. He’s your friend but I’m warning you that if he starts bossing us around, I won’t be able to hold my tongue.
And so it went.

NFLX continues to be a short, the CEO’s mea culpa aside, if for no other reason than content costs will significantly crimp margins. Perhaps the Europeans should look at Hastings strategy and separate insolvent Greece from the rest of the union, the Greeks being the NFLX version of a legacy DVD business. Apparently, Hastings doesn’t want his company’s valuation in the market to be painted with the broad brush of a declining or slower growth business so he is separating the 2 businesses. Perhaps Merkel et al should invite him to their next get together. At least he is sure to bring the entertainment.

So here I am in Nashville sitting at the gate waiting for my flight to Newark. CNN is on and everyone seems to be transfixed by the conversation leading up to the President’s speech on deficit reduction and taxes. I don’t think I have ever seen this level of interest before. Most have barely taken a bite of their deep fried bagels – everything is deep fried here, even the sushi. This is America, Nascar country as their attire attests, Dale Junior’s number featured prominently. I often wonder why they revere Junior given he’s crossed the finish line about as often as an Obama legislative proposal on taxes.

Like an Earnhardt fan, expectations were apparently incredibly high going into the weekend. But like an Earnhardt fan, the experience only resulted in disheartening disappointment. I’ve noted before that our two party system can’t agree on much these days so any expectation that the Euro’s 17 backers, some with effectively more than 2 party systems, will agree on a bailout measure for the banks and the PIIGS in a compressed time frame is folly.

Merkel is losing her mandate as yet another election pointed out this past weekend as her FDP partner suffered defeat. This conceivably puts Europe in a precarious position without a strong voice. Clearly, the coalition is fracturing, unable to even offer a carrot to the markets when they knew one was so desperately needed. Expectations are possibly higher for the FOMC to release a Q3 type statement on Weds. But even if they do, it will only provide a short term lift to the market for the economic fundamentals continue to worsen. Yes there are pockets of strength, the high end has been the savior, and the Apple ecosystem has done more than its share, but there is no disputing the declining economic picture and I would not continue to look for the upper end consumer to thrive, not in the face of higher taxes. Bullish prognosticators note the decline in the averages from the peak as more than having discounted any perceived economic malaise while hanging onto the belief that we are in a soft patch. Need I remind them that when the market rose to such heights, the global economy was on an upswing and the European sovereign mess just a twinkle in a dollar bull’s eye. Now the economy has slowed, if not reversed, and the collapse of the potential for a collapse of the Euro is real.

But the President has an answer for us. He wants to tax investment income as ordinary income, essentially removing any incentive for assumption of risk. In a perilous market environment, why put any capital at risk if there is little chance for reward? Less investment means less money sloshing around the economy and fewer jobs being created. And while we’re watching the acrimony in Washington, how about drafting the rest of us into a financial civil war, dividing the citizenry into two classes, pitting one against the other, all in the name of politics?

None of this is positive for the economy or the markets which is why I continue to be bearish

I added to my Euro short against the dollar on Thursday and still believe par is where the Euro will ultimately reside even if the new Troika comes out with a bailout package. Actually, that will further fortify my already strong conviction. Given my view on the slowing world economy – yes, even China will slow – I have exited my energy positions for the most part recalling that crude got decimated in the ’08 financial meltdown as demand suffered and speculative traders lost their appetite for risk (and their margin). The one bright spot is LNG as global demand is increasing sharply as a function of Japan and Germany using less nuclear power and Japan, China and India looking for a next generation solution to their burgeoning energy demands supposedly willing to pay as much as $20/btu all in. As more tankers and terminals are built for export, this will help sop up our overabundance of natural gas. And although I have little faith it will happen, should the administration ever propose a real energy policy, that, by the way would also create a number of jobs, natural gas would have to be in the equation.

I guess I’m not really surprised by the muted reaction in gold to all the negativity since gold is a risk asset and the appetite for risk is waning once again and margin requirements more lofty. It’s not a bad thing to see a high flying trade enter into a consolidation phase. I will keep my eye on it, looking for opportunity but will probably miss it again.


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