Posts Tagged 'HK'

Damn! I know That Invite Was Here Somewhere

merci, ben

danke, ben

謝謝你,本

Gracias, Ben

ベン、ありがとうございました

σας ευχαριστώ, ben

شكرا لكم، بن

 

The world over, in every language, from French to Mandarin to Greek to Arabic, the same words are being spoken with incredible enthusiasm, often in a voice that cracks with unbridled emotion and gratitude.  They are 3 simple words: Thank you, Ben.  But there are always the forgotten ones, those who declined the invite. Now, they lay in their beds, pulling their pillows tightly over their heads, cursing the loud music and laughter coming from next door as they hold firm to their righteous beliefs that such frivolity does no one any good, it’s too late, it’s too dangerous, it’s sacrilege, it’s too Keynesian.  Good luck with handling the outflows.

 

Frankly, I don’t care if Keynes is throwing the party, or Bernanke or Draghi.  All I want is to have a good time.  I don’t care if the host pays the caterer after I leave or doesn’t – ain’t my problem, ain’t my job.  And cleaning up – that ain’t my job either, I’ll be long gone before the mess has to be cleaned up.

 

I was in a similar situation once.  I was in college, working weekends at a job that started at 6 AM so I decided to go to bed early. It wasn’t my usual M.O. but I had peaked earlier in the week and was exhausted. With the party in the dorm just getting going, I found myself tossing and turning and cursing out those morons next door.  Finally, I threw off the covers and threw on the jeans and joined in.  Someone else would have to throw the towels in the washer at the tennis club (or I would just fold the dirty ones – who would know? They sweat like pigs anyway).

 

So the bears have a choice: let common sense and a strong belief that what Bernanke is doing is wrong and miss the party or say “what the hell” and join in. If they’re smart, they took the latter route and realized that it’s not their job to debate economic policy and what the long term impact of QE’s will be; it’s their job to make money and when the world over is easing – except for the Chinese who’s contribution is to pay lip service to it – you have to lift the glass.

 

Thus the only question is how much of a good time is too much?  Can I throw back that lost jelly shot or is it time to hail a cab and head home.  For me, my margin of error is sometime before Rosie O’Donnell starts looking like Kate Upton and when I start talking about how, at 5’8” inches (maybe), I used to be able to dunk a basketball. But having been around long enough, I’m not going to get greedy.  I’ll be back to shorting materials soon but for now I drink the castor oil and am long some of the worst positioned companies I could find: steel and iron ore. I do feel guilty going to the dark side but these are only trades.

 

My favorite quote of the day comes from Home Depot as they announce the closure of 7 big boxes in China:

 

“China is a do-it-for-me market, not a do-it-yourself market, so we have to adjust,” the company said, although the country’s slowing economy is also not helping.

 

Are these really the same people that are going to take over the world?  They can’t even find their Chosen One although I had heard he was spotted in Macau driving a Ferrari with a Pamela Anderson look-alike (circa 1998) in the passenger seat while looking for a role as an extra on The Hangover III.

Did You Hear the One About the Bull… China, Europe and Global Growth Stocks

There is an oft told, though not particularly amusing story about an old bull and his son who stood atop a hill glancing down at a herd of attractive heifers. Exercising his fatherly duties, the newly divorced elder bull cautioned the youngster about charging down the steep slope to, let’s politely say, curry favor with the cows that grazed below.

“Com’on, Dad. Let’s go get ’em.”

“Easy there, boy,” the father cautioned, “it’s not always good to move too far too fast. Just ask the hare that lives in that hole next door to the barn.”

“I guess you’re right,” the son responded. “Slow seems to win an awful lot.”

“Slow is not the same thing as deliberate. Deliberate is what I’m after.” “But what about the Roadrunner, Pops?” the young stud inquired, “That darn bird seems to win every time and he looks like he’s havin’ an awful lot of fun racing around.”

“You may have a point there, kid,” came the response as the father looked below, a smile forming on his lip, a twinkle brightening his dark brown eyes. “Let’s deliberately run down there and have a good old time. Don’t know what I was worried about.”

Setting aside his discipline and years of experience, the old bull was drawn in by visions of what could be if all went right. He galloped down the hill, pausing ever so briefly to enjoy himself along the way. But all good things eventually come to an end and often the easier it seems in the beginning morphs into greater difficulties at the end. Well, it didn’t end well that day for the elder bull who would eventually keel over, ending up as a set of loafers and matching billfold. In the interim, though, he sure had fun.

As with the bovines portrayed above, it’s been a quick and happy romp for the Wall Street bulls, of which I have been one. However, I have no intention of keeling over while hanging on for one more conquest. To some, the bull market is showing signs of tiring while to others, the indices will continue to move higher. Me – well, I have ratcheted down my exposure to a slight positive bias to the market – short global growth, long defensive. I am positioned this way because I see the cows at the bottom of the hill looking decidedly less attractive in the second half of the year when the slowdown in Europe and China become much more evident. That will be when the austerity measures come full measure and the realization hits that Germany alone can’t drive the EU economy but, rather, is itself dependent upon an increasingly inward looking and slowing China as well as its EU brethren who were the direct beneficiaries of Deutschland’s indirect largess via the troika. It is also when we will revisit Greece, if not sooner, and possibly Portugal. So without EU governments being able to stimulate their own economies through major public works projects; without their banks, despite the LTRO, having enough balance sheet to lend (or choosing instead to make easier money through the risk-less carry trade); without the ECB actually being able to print money; and with China’s property bubble gushing air instead of hissing, the headwinds will likely cause a downdraft in the averages.

China lowering their GDP target doesn’t bother me that much for a few reasons. First of all, it wasn’t a surprise – in fact, I mentioned it last week. No great vision on my part since it was the consensus estimate. Even more supportive of my fortune telling acumen, the government had leaked major portions of the statement. The bears fear not though for China has always outperformed their targets and is perhaps setting the bar low for the new comrades coming into office. And doesn’t it matter that 7.5% growth, which may in fact turn out to be 8% if history is a guide, will equate to just slightly less than the same amount of growth as in 2011 owing to a larger base from which to measure the change? (I actually find it somewhat amusing that much of what I read from the Street believes that China will continue to grow at 9-10% despite a clear trend lower.) But the action will turn inward as China grows the domestic economy through consumption rather than exports. This, to me, means less fueling of the global economy. And, of course, slower growth is, at the end of the day, slower growth. I am still not convinced China will have a soft landing – far from it. The property bubble is continuing to deflate and the central government still has little interest, it appears, in bailing out the Rolex wearing, Ferrari driving, developers. This has been made extremely clear in the beating back of measures enacted by local governments, including Wuhu and Shanghai, to foster a recovery in property prices through employing mechanisms such as relaxing credit or allowing the purchase of a second home. Not least of all, let’s not forget that some important economic indicators in China are showing contraction or multi-year weakness. There is the school of thought, of which I am not a student, that believes we shouldn’t worry about China and Europe since U.S. GDP is not overly reliant upon either Europe, 2% of total U.S. GDP, or China, 0.6% of GDP, but given that our economic revival is not particularly robust, any potential hit to growth has to be regarded seriously. And it is the strengthening domestic economy, abetted by perhaps misplaced optimism on the global economy that overshadows the current weakness abroad.

Not a lot has changed in my favorite longs and shorts with the exception of initiating a short position in U.S. bonds but I will leave that story for another note. I still prefer domestic focused companies that provide downside protection through yield or have branded franchises with a strong IP advantage or value proposition: VZ, QCOM, WLP, HK and CSC, a very interesting value name with a new CEO, low valuation and strong prospects for a turnaround. JPM is very attractive, as is WFC. They will pick up significant share from the moribund European banks, a taste of which was in WFC’s recent moves including announcing an expansion in Europe and buying BNP Paribas energy business. Strong foreign banks such as UBS will also benefit. This is an incredible opportunity for domestic banks to replace the earnings they lost from Dodd-Frank. Coal remains a core short, despite the decline in the price of the shares. Aside from WLT, which derives almost its entire earnings from met coal, virtually every other coal company generates 70-80% of revenues and earnings from steam coal. This is true of even two of the world’s largest met coal producers, ACI and BTU. Reportedly, ACI’s acquisition of Massey is not going well, an asset they clearly overpaid for, and Moody’s put them on negative watch. Additionally, as part of China’s 5 year plan, they intend to increase coal production by only 3.7%. This is despite the fact that reportedly, 40% of power generators in China that use coal lost money in 2010. Imbedded in the 4% inflation target in the 2012 plan are higher utility prices which is intended to provide relief while lowering usage. Domestically, the warm weather has resulted in stockpiles that utilities will take a long time to work off and the conversion to natural gas from coal at these plants is continuing, arguably picking up momentum. This is occasioned not just by price, but more so by environmental mandates. As to bituminous or met coal, my view on steel remains that as Europe falls into broad recession, China cools and construction continues to weaken, steel prices will continue to weaken. This will lead to more exports from Europe into the U.S. and, of course, China keeps adding to steel mill capacity. I am also short JCP, purely an issue of timing on the turnaround and what is already reflected in the stock price, and KSS. Both troll for customers in a very tough space. On the other side, I am long M.

To bottom line it, the market is in a consolidation phase and faces the likelihood of a minor correction near term while remaining highly dependent upon data in the U.S. and continued optimism about the European and Chinese economies. This Friday’s jobs number could untrack the indices either way but watch out for the second half when the can hits the wall.

Paris Hilton, Europe and China, Energy – Natural Gas: the new HK and CHK, AAPL

The ratings agencies continue to be as effective as Paris Hilton at a spelling bee as seen by Moody’s latest action of putting some banks under review.   The real troubled period for the U.S. banks has, for the most part passed, so near as I can tell the ratings agencies are pressing their shorts.  To paraphrase the anti-motto of the UFT: “Those that analyze, analyze and those that can’t, work for the ratings agencies.”  Throughout my career, I never recall anyone resigning from a fund or investment bank to go on to the greener passages of the ratings agencies.  “I’ve finally made it; my dreams have come true.  I’ve landed this incredible position at S&P.  Sure I will have to get a night job to make up for the lower pay and have to adjust to working in a cubicle the size of a bathroom stall – it’s not easy balancing my family pictures on a roll of toilet paper – but I have my nights free and significantly less pressure since there is no penalty for being late or wrong.”  As a comedian feels about a significantly overweight individual with a very bad toupee, we should all be indebted to the ratings agencies for providing us with such easy fodder.

 

China continues to be a primary concern for me. I noted yesterday the downside of China’s check in the mail commitment to assist in the European bailout as a sign that things are worse for China’s economy than the market has believed.  I postulated the Chinese are seeing more than passing weakness in their economy as a derivative of the weakness in Europe, their largest trading partner.  And today we see the rationale for China’s magnanimous and proactive statement of financial support.  Foreign investment in China is declining and is at the lowest level since 2009, the bottom of the last recession.  Earlier in the week, the city of Wuhu terminated their policy of providing subsidies to home buyers at the behest of the central government, signaling to me that they are more concerned with a property bubble and inflation than they are with a slowing economy, recognizing what Greenspan failed to see.  China bulls remain steadfast in their conviction of a soft landing, the strategy underlying this belief is that the communists will deploy their massive (but fading) foreign reserves in support of Ferrari driving real estate developers, overextended municipal governments (40% of revenues from property sales and subsequent deals to develop), shadow financiers and the occasional overextended homeowner.  Now add in profligate European sovereigns and we have the first “born again” communist country.  Somehow, I believe this will not be the case, given their very long term view; they will let these folks all suffer their sins to a large extent and not be as generous as a Greek politician who has had way too many shots of ouzo.

 

However, with Europe estimated to account for approximately 18% of their trade, look for  increasing comments professing support.  In fact, China may decide to tender for the EU rather than picking off their assets piecemeal.

 

Greece will ultimately default even though the troika may put them on an allowance rather than providing a lump sum.  The installment plan buys the troika more time to put together a plan to ring fence the other over extended sovereigns.   A Grecian default, not to be confused with allowing the gray to grow out from your scalp, would result in a knee jerk reaction lower in the markets and then a move higher as the credit markets realize that the EU is finally ready to enforce fiscal discipline.   This would actually cause a major rally in the Euro but for now I am staying short, having rebuilt the position over the last week on the belief that all the good news was out and as crowded as the short trade was, the long trade was now the more popular investment.

 

I’m still in the camp of consolidation with somewhat higher equity exposure in lower beta, value stocks and short positions in commodities such as coal, steel and copper.    Perhaps we get a reaction move lower but with the massive liquidity in global markets and more due on 2/29 from the new and kinder “ECB”, bonds are the riskier asset and stocks more attractive.

 

And  one more thing, Apple.  I get that the stock action has accounted for a large percentage of the underlying averages but two things: the story is far from over and the market can move independently from the shares of AAPL.

 

Natural gas.  Looks like the lows may have been put in.  At the end of the day, we’re capitalists and the energy industry in this country is still one of the best managed sectors we have.  While the glut is not over, and hopefully the government recognizes the wisdom of incenting greater usage of natural gas as a replacement for crude, the shut ins are encouraging.  Of course, while the warm weather has increased “inventory” levels of natural gas and coal, these will be depleted at some point and are arguably reflected in the price of the equities to a large extent.  We have two CEO’s in energy that actually do what they say they will do: Floyd Wilson and Aubrey McClendon.  Floyd has been a major creator of wealth as he built and sold, to the benefit of shareholders, 3 companies. He is now in the process of doing it again with Halcon Resources (HK, a ticker in the Hall of Fame for its association with Petrohawk, has had its jersey unretired).  He makes no bones about it: I will build it and exit.  The $550 million he brought to the party underscores his commitment.  As to CHK, admittedly the debt levels, not so onerous in a different environment, are squarely in Aubrey’s sights and he has surprised the Street yet again by targeting higher levels of asset sales and further pay down of debt.  Underlying this, and somewhat unnoticed, is the transformation of a company too dependent upon natural gas (they have also announced they will shut in some gas)  to one with a stronger focus on liquids.  This is what will also drive the new HK – a focus on liquids as opposed to Petrohawk’s dry gas model.  Top CEOs understand and respond to changing market dynamics.

 

Disclosure: I am long HK, CHK, EUO and short AAPL puts.


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